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Organic Soil Indispensable In Agribusiness We know of plants that survive clinging to high stone cliffs. Orchids nestle on lofty tree branches. Some plants are considered parasitic, feeding off from other living organisms. Still, almost all plants rely on nutrients from soil rich with organic matter for their growth. Crop production in agribusiness relies heavily on organic soil, not only because of its composition, but the mechanical benefit organic soil provides in improving soil drainage and making soil less compacted for ease in planting and plant root development. Soil organic amendment to increase soil nutrient content, making soil much more resistant to pathogenic invasion, as well as devising methods for organic soil content consistency, are now the trends in agribusiness. The thrust of organic farming is the production and use of “healthy soil” that develops a powerful mycelial layer which helps detoxify the land from pesticides and chemicals. Research confirms decomposing organic matter at high levels deters pest infestations. Thus, organic farmers do not need to rely on pesticide since the richness of the soil provides some sort of pant natural protection. This helps increase yield as well as reduce crop raising costs since organic farming usually uses fifty percent less energy compared to the mechanized, chemically oriented methods of agribusiness. There is also the plus of produce grown in organic soil containing more levels of nutrients, minerals and anti-oxidants, making these attractive to health-conscious consumers.
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Forests, marshlands and agricultural fields where dead plants are transformed by different kinds of living organisms are the primary sources for organic matter contained in soil. The transformation involves several steps, the start usually mechanical and progresses to more chemical processes. The decomposition process is hastened by microorganisms present in the soil (which also are integral components of soil organic matter). Excreta produced by animals also contribute to soil organic matter as well as the decomposed corpses of dead animals and organisms.
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The depletion of naturally-occurring organic soils requires organic farmers to develop soil that contains essential organic compounds suitable to grow certified organic produce. Farmers come up with the right mix of biomass (containing necessary microorganisms), fresh and partially decomposed residues and humus (the well-decomposed organic material) devoid of surface litter to spread on their lands for growing certified organic produce. Organic soil thus developed in the United States must conform to established USDA criteria, although much of the practice in developing countries employ composting methods with the compost used to augment planting beds. Suitable soil organic matter production is vital to successful organic farming. It is essential that soil organic matter be used together with effective organic farm management processes that strictly adhere to applicable regulations. Organic farming is a profitable enterprise and sustainable within the context of environment management and enhancement.