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What You Should Know About Raised-Bed Gardens Raised-beds are very trendy in gardening circles. Raised gardens are responsible for bringing new people to the world of gardening. Because of raise-bed gardens, more people are able to garden. Because you don’t need to dig into the ground, you can have a raised garden almost anywhere. Raised gardens make having a garden possible for people who rent property and might not be allowed to dig. Raised-bed gardens even make it possible for people who live in places with dead soil to have gardens. If you want to have your own raised garden, and want some tips, continue reading. The biggest advantage of a raise-bed garden is that you don’t have to till the ground. Newbies are a little hesitant to destroy their lawn for something they aren’t positive they will like, be good at or continue with. With raised-bed gardens you don’t have to worry about getting your soil sampled either. You don’t have to learn about soil make-up (at least not right away) with raised bed gardens which can be intimidating to novices. With raised bed gardens you use bagged soil which already has the right levels.
Lessons Learned About Gardens
However, using bag soil means that you may often have to switch it out or supplement it. In regular traditional gardens there is much more soil, which means much more nutrients for plants to utilize. Raised-bed gardens are more susceptible to soil depletion because there just isn’t as much soil. Crop rotation is much more important with raised bed gardens.
Lessons Learned About Gardens
You won’t have to weed either if you have a raised-bed garden. With traditional gardens, grass seeds continue grow, which leads to weeds. But bagged soil doesn’t have that problem because there are no grass seeds in the bagged soil. However, if the bottom of your raised bed garden doesn’t have proper barrier between the box and the ground, grass could break through. Cardboard beneath the soil should keep the weeds out. If you plan on growing perennials, they’ll need special consideration. Perennials survive through the cold months by growing their roots deep into the ground where it’s warmer. However, raised-beds don’t allow perennials to grow as deep as traditional gardens do. Many raised-bed gardens are only six inches deep. This is enough soil for most plants that people want to grow but not for perennials that need to burrow down into the ground when the weather gets cold. Your perennials beds should be about 18 inches deep. Raised-bed gardens are great way for beginners to get into gardening. If you feel that you need a little more guidance, you can probably find some help and your local home and gardening store.